What one pastor read last week (04.16 – 04.22.18)

My Goodreads Reading List and Updates: click HERE

Last week, for Acts: “…to the end of the earth.” (Sunday School), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For study in 2 Peter (current sermon series), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For supplementary reading in prepartion for a marriage conference in the fall:
General reading for work as a pastor:

***denotes future article forthcoming

What one pastor read last week (04.09 – 04.015.18)

(for the rationale, see the note at the bottom)

My Goodreads Reading List and Updates: click HERE

Last week, for Acts: “…to the end of the earth.” (Sunday School), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For study in 2 Peter (current sermon series), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For supplementary reading in prepartion for a marriage conference in the fall:
General reading for work as a pastor:

***denotes future article forthcoming

RATIONALE:

  • Gonna’ try to start keeping an online record of my reading for work. This will: 1) show others the types of things they could be reading, too; 2) will help me keep a searchable record of the topics I read about, and 3) help me start generating article ideas. I need to become a better writer. In the past, when inspiration has hit (to write more frequently) I often don’t have more than one idea at a time. This will help me keep a long list of things I need to write about. Lastly, the frequency of questions from people (in the church) has increased in the last year and this approach will help me collect my thoughts in one place.

What one pastor read last week (04.02 – 04.08.18)

(for the rationale, see the note at the bottom)

My Goodreads Reading List and Updates: click HERE

Last week, for Acts: “…to the end of the earth.” (Sunday School), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For study in 2 Peter (current sermon series), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For supplementary reading in prepartion for a marriage conference in the fall:
General reading for work as a pastor:

***denotes future article forthcoming

RATIONALE:

  • Gonna’ try to start keeping an online record of my reading for work. This will: 1) show others the types of things they could be reading, too; 2) will help me keep a searchable record of the topics I read about, and 3) help me start generating article ideas. I need to become a better writer. In the past, when inspiration has hit (to write more frequently) I often don’t have more than one idea at a time. This will help me keep a long list of things I need to write about. Lastly, the frequency of questions from people (in the church) has increased in the last year and this approach will help me collect my thoughts in one place.

How to almost guarantee I won’t read the article you just posted

In a recent Facebook post, Eerdmans Publishing, re-posted this headline:

“This woman preacher is schooling the Christian boys club on the crucifixion”

It was in reference to an article highlighting one of their author’s recent work.

In light of my own headline, here’s what I posted in their comments, on Facebook:

“I strongly believe men and women should be able to talk about the atonement. The Bible clearly affirms that men and women, young and old, Jew and Greek, can each have the Spirit through faith in Jesus Christ alone, having repented of their sins.

However, it’s simply a non-sequitur to say, “Rev.” and “woman preacher”.

I appreciate Eerdmans publishing. I have many of their volumes. Question though: is there a more inviting and winsome way to engage with those in your audience who would affirm what Christians have affirmed for the vast majority of 2000 years?

If so – if there is a more winsome way to engage those of us in the “Christian boys club”, then I might suggest altering your headlines in the future. As it stands, it’s simply reflective of someone who is probably young (thinking early 20s max), someone who has probably not been discipled well by both older men and women, and someone who puffs themselves up with witticisms and clever repartee.

If the goal was: “Lots of comments on this post”, well, ya’ got me.

If it was, “I would like to post this and engage with those who would be disinclined to agree with me, so that they might at least benefit from learning more from an alternative viewpoint”, then I would suggest that you failed.

Would you like, please, to start over and try again?”

UPDATE: having clicked on the article to get a hyperlink, I see that it is authored by a young man who has made a name for himself upsetting the orthodox status-quo for several years now, giving platform to a long-string of others who have likewise-abandoned the faith “once and for all handed down to the saints.”

What one pastor read last week (03.26 – 04.01.18)

(for the rationale, see the note at the bottom)

My Goodreads Reading List and Updates: click HERE

Last week, for Acts: “…to the end of the earth.” (Sunday School), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
For study in 2 Peter (current sermon series), I read from the following book(s) and came across these insights:
  • For sermon prep re: 2 Peter 3:8-18
    • 03.26 Barth, Karl, Geoffrey William Bromiley, and Thomas F. Torrance. Church Dogmatics: The Doctrine of God, Part 1. Vol. 2. London; New York: T&T Clark, 2004. pp. 416-418

    • ***This is a really encouraging meditation on God’s patience (2 Peter 3:8-9, 15)

  • N/A
For supplementary reading in prepartion for a marriage conference in the fall:
General reading for work as a pastor:

***denotes future article forthcoming

RATIONALE:

  • Gonna’ try to start keeping an online record of my reading for work. This will: 1) show others the types of things they could be reading, too; 2) will help me keep a searchable record of the topics I read about, and 3) help me start generating article ideas. I need to become a better writer. In the past, when inspiration has hit (to write more frequently) I often don’t have more than one idea at a time. This will help me keep a long list of things I need to write about. Lastly, the frequency of questions from people (in the church) has increased in the last year and this approach will help me collect my thoughts in one place.